Huge 5-Day Auction of High-Volume Precision CNC Machining Operation from Triumph Manufacturing

NORTHBROOK, Ill., Oct. 15, 2019 /PRNewswire/ — Hilco Industrial, in partnership with Machinery Network Auctions and Machinery Marketing International, announced that they will conduct a 5-day auction consisting of over 3,500 lots of machinery and equipment used for Tier 2 automotive parts manufacturing from Triumph’s 130,000 sq ft. facility in Tempe, Arizona. The auction will be split into a 2-day live, onsite & webcast auction held on 6 & 7 November 2019 at 10 am MT and a 3-day online-only auction closing 12 – 14 November 2019 starting at 9 am MT. Triumph Manufacturing was a high-volume Tier 2 automotive parts manufacturer specializing in the production of turned and machined parts utilizing a variety of machining processes for several major Tier 1 automotive suppliers worldwide. The webcast auction will feature over 1,500 lots including (150+) CNC & Multi-Spindle Screw Machines, CNC Swiss-Type Lathes, CNC Turning Centers, Rotary Transfer Machines, Centerless Grinders, (7) CNC Vertical Machining Centers, from manufacturers such as Tornos, Schutte, Nakumura-Tome, Mikron, Haas, Ganesh, Cincinnati-Milacron, and much more. The online-only auction will ...

Metal Additive Manufacturing for Large Parts > ENGINEERING.com

YPE html PUBLIC “-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN” “http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd”> It can be an ugly truth—just ask anyone who’s been picked last on the playground—but it can also be a source of pride; just think of all the engineering projects that are described as the largest, longest or tallest in the world. In manufacturing, large part production has historically been costly and time-consuming, but the growth of metal 3D printing (if you’ll pardon the pun) is changing that paradigm. While metal 3D printing can be broken down into various sub-types—powder bed fusion (PBF), selective laser melting (SLM), electron beam additive manufacturing (EBAM), etc.—not all of these are suitable for (or even capable of) making large parts.  “Parts that are smaller than a laptop computer are typically ideal for powder bed,” explained John O’Hara, Global Sales Manager at Sciaky, Inc. “They’re capable of making closed cavities, internal cooling channels and surfaces that are going to be useful as-deposited, but the trade-off to get that is a much lower deposition rate.” When it comes to 3D printing large metal parts, deposition rate ...