recipe When craving the fruit and veggies produced in the Ohio River Valley, it was only within the last ten years my mind began to go to the delicious fig. Always a fan of this sweet and humble fruit, I was unaware there were so many of my neighbors growing them in their own back yards. My first experience with a fresh-picked Kentucky fig was after an insane Saturday of cooking in downtown Maysville.

It had been one of those days where you think you are gonna close up shop at two or three and suddenly it’s four or five. I had fed what felt like everyone on both sides of the river except for my own growling tummy. If you talk to most cooks or chefs, professional or at home, we have no problem feeding everyone else but for some reason we struggle to feed ourselves after a busy day over the oven. The last thing I felt like doing was eating anything I had created that day. Or even worse, cooking something new and spending more time over the oven.

My stomach growled as one more customer and friend approached the counter. She had a small cloth bag over her arm. I asked her what she would like from the menu, as I was getting ready to close up shop. To my surprise she pulled out three beautiful figs she had just picked before coming to visit me. I will never grow tired of the gift of food or eating someone else’s food. I pulled out the closed sign, grabbed a cutting board, knife, jar of honey, and a little goat cheese and rushed to join my thoughtful friend for a late lunch. To this day I don’t ever recall enjoying a fig so much. They were still warm from the sun and melted in your mouth with every bite. We could’ve eaten ten of them, but it made them feel more special in many ways that we could only eat the three. I was full of bliss and Kentucky figs I didn’t even realize existed.

You don’t have to have-grown figs in order to enjoy them, but it never hurts to know someone that does. Today I have included one of my favorite delicious fig recipes. It can be made from fresh figs or dried figs. But don’t let me mislead you, the fig doesn’t need anything to taste delicious but if you wanna wow guests with a sophisticated but simple ingredient be sure and include the humble but decadent fig. Good luck and enjoy!

• Look for slightly firm fruit. They will yield slightly too gentle pressure on their outer skin. Avoid any that feel too soft to the touch. If a slightly sour smell is produced by the fruit, don’t eat it. You can’t just a fig by its color as they range from greenish yellow, purple, to black.

• After picking or purchasing, be sure and tore in a refrigerator and try and use within a few days.

Wash fruit before serving or cooking. Don’t feel like you have to use silverware with this juicy fruit. It’s best eaten uncooked and out of your hand when fresh.

Combine flour, 1/4 cup sugar and 1/8 tsp salt in a food processor and pulse to combine. Add 1/ cup butter and pulse 6-8 times or until the butter is the size of small peas. Gradually add the ice water, pulsing constantly until the dough just begins to adhere. Place the dough on a piece of plastic wrap and shape into a disc. Wrap the plastic wrap and chill for two hours or longer.

Combine the hazelnuts and one cup sugar in a food processor and pulse until finely ground. Add one cup butter and pulse until combined. Add the eggs one at a time, processing until combined after each addition. Chill for two hours or longer.

Let the dough stand at room temperature for five to ten minutes. Roll the dough ½ inch thick on a lightly floured surface and cut into eight to ten rounds with a five inch cutter. Chill the rounds for twenty minutes. Roll the rounds into six inch circles on a lightly floured surface. Toss the figs, honey, ¼ cup sugar and 1/8 tsp salt in a bowl and let stand at room temperature for twenty minutes.

Preheat the oven to 32 degrees. Place the chilled rounds on one or two baking sheets and spoon one tbsp. of the hazelnut mix on the center of each of the chilled circles. Evenly divide the fig mixture among the rounds. Beginning at the top, fold the dough over itself towards the center, working all the way around the circle. You should have a 1 1/2-inch rolled edge enclosing the figs. Whisk the egg yolks and cream in a bowl until blended and bush over the dough. Sprinkle with ¼ cup sugar and bake for 20-30 minutes or until golden brown.

The recipe used in today’s article is from the kitchen of Chef Babz ([email protected]) with a little help from Zoe Coulson, The Good Housekeeping Cookbook, 1973.

Brown sugar, why do you taste so good? As a kid, I would just suck on the raw sweet until it melted in my mouth. Ok, sometimes I still do. It’s crazy to me when I meet folks from other areas of the country who are still strangers to the joy of this melt-in-your-mouth sweetness.

Kentucky and Ohio cooks are no strangers to brown sugar. Not just one kind of brown sugar, but dark and light brown sugars are typically found in most area kitchens and pantries. It was never a surprise to see my grandmother reach into a jar of the delicious golden treasure and sprinkle a small handful into whatever she was cooking. I’ve often tried to immolate that behavior, but many times since my childhood I’ve ended up eating a spoonful of sugar in the process.

The brown definitely has a different weight mass than other sugars. But many folks don’t realize where it gets its umph. The molasses in the brown sugar absorbs water easily and continues that theme in the food it is paired with. The lighter the brown sugar has 3.5 percent molasses by weight and dark brown sugar contains 6.5 percent molasses by weight. Light is typically used in baking.

Known by many names such as Muscovado, Demerara, Golden Baker’s, Golden Caster, and even just amber crystals. The delicious treasure brings out a flavor that has a scrumptious complex simplicity about it. Many of the South’s rich sauces, desserts, and even marinades and rubs are inspired by the sweet molasses sucrose.

b) Do not leave out. The longer the brown sugar is exposed, the quicker it will evaporate it’s moisture out.

c) Hardened brown sugar may be softened by storing with bread or an apple, sliced. Within an hour, the sugar will be soft again.

Mix all ingredients thoroughly except chicken. Ingredients double as a marinade and a glaze. Marinade chicken for at least 30 minutes prior to baking, grilling, or stovetop cooking. After chicken has cooked, add glaze to each piece with a brush. Cook slightly longer, allowing sauce to thicken around meat. Veggies, rice, and other side items are also delicious if you have any of the additional ingredients left. If baking in the oven, veggies may be added to pan of meat.

Combine all the ingredients in a chilled mixing bowl and whip until cream is fluffy and stiff. Do not over-whip. –

In a medium-sized bowl, mix all dry ingredients. Add peaches and pecans and mix thoroughly. Mix oil with buttermilk and add all together, blending well. Refrigerate while you make sauce.

Blend peaches and water to make a water puree with some lumps remaining. In a heavy saucepan, mix sugar, cornstarch and salt. Add Peach puree and stir over medium heat until blended, taking care not to let the cornstarch lump. Mix until mix begins to thicken.

Pour puree into a 9×13 inch baking dish. using a large serving spoon, drop refrigerated dumplings into the peach sauce, leaving a little space between each dumpling. They can nest close to one another, but shouldn’t touch. Bake in 375 degree oven for 30 minutes. Serve warm with brown sugar whipped cream.

Beat eggs. Mix cornstarch and sugars. Add dry ingredients to eggs. In a large sauce pan on medium heat, add scalded milk and cook. Stir constantly, monitoring to avoid burning. Continue until the spoon is heavily coated. Remove from heat and allow to cool. Add the rest of the milk and cream, mix. Portions should fill 1 gallon. Freeze.

The recipes and photo used in today’s article are from the kitchen of Chef Babz (babzbites@gmail.com) with a little help from Brown Sugar, By Joyce White 2003; Shuck Beans, Stack Cakes, & Honest Fried Chicken, By Ronnie Lundy 1991; The Good Housekeeping Cookbook, Zoe Coulson 1973.

RUSSELL THEATRE — Oct. 4, 7 p.m., “The Wizard of Oz”; Oct. 4, 9:30 p.m., “Beetlejuice”; Oct. 12, 9 p.m., “Sleepy Hollow.”

A VISITOR’S VIEW OF MAYSVILLE — Presented by Ohio River Valley Artist Guild, during October, begins with First Friday opening reception, 5-7 p.m., Oct. 4 and runs through Tuesday, Oct. 29, at the Cox Gallery, Second Floor.

VFW HOUSE OF HORRORS — Every Saturday in October and Oct. 31 from 8 p.m. to midnight. Cost is $5 per person. Veterans and active duty military receive free admission with a valid ID. All proceeds benefit local veterans, Simon Kenton VFW Post 2734, 3177 Kentucky 9, Maysville.

STAR SPANGLED CELEBRATION — 7 p.m., Nov 1, Fields Auditorium on the campus of Maysville Community and Technical College, hosted by Bob Herzog with music by Julie Clarke, Mary Griffey and Judy Gallenstein along with MCIS Chorus, Maysville Community Band and specialperforomance by MacKenzie Thomas.

KENTUCKY GATEWAY MUSEUM CENTER presents THE OLD POGUE EXPERIENCE — Showcasing the history of Maysville’s Bourbon Industry and the Old Pogue Distillery. Exhibits in the Limestone Building,corner of Second and Sutton Streets in Downtown Maysville, Tuesday to Saturday, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. For tickets visit KYGMC at 215 Sutton Street, Downtown Maysville. For additional information phone 606-564-5865.

Last night, Sunday, at sunset, marked the spiritual beginning of the Jewish year and the beginning of the festival season known as the High Holidays, Rosh Hashanah, which is the name of the Jewish New Year. It kicks off the period of celebration and reflection by gathering friends and family together to celebrate the many blessings of the previous year and the sweetness of the full year ahead. Rosh Hashanah has always been one of my favorite holidays because at its very core this New Year is a reminder of the sweetness of life. It is impossible to associate sweetness without thinking of food, and this time of observance has many symbolic and seasonal foods associated with it. The foods of the season are celebrated in various ways. Including apples dipped in honey and fruitful pomegranates. This beautiful holiday is full of symbolism. It has many reflections but not just for ourselves and our families. Prayer is a common theme, even on a global scale, as others needs are put above our own. A key aspect of Judaism is Tikkun Olam, a concept defined by acts of kindness performed to perfect or repair the world. Many households, regardless of religion would agree this starts with sitting down and breaking bread together, reminding ourselves and each other to remember the significant moments of life.

Today I have included one of my favorite recipes for honey cake. There are so many ways to make a moist and delicious honey cake. There are more than a few ingredients to choose from. Honey cake is dish that brings the fall season into your kitchen and onto your table. Good luck and enjoy!

(Recommended pan size: 11×6 x 4 inch baking pan or for two small cakes, use 2 9-inch loaf pans. Line with wax paper or aluminum foil and spray with cake nonstick spray)

Sift the flour, salt, baking powder, baking soda and optional spices together. Beat eggs, slowly adding the sugar. Beat until thick and light in color. Add oil, honey, and coffee or other optional liquid ingredient. Stir in the flour mix and or optional nuts. Pour batter into pan or pans. If using one pan, bake for one hour and 20-30 minutes. If using two pans, bake for 50 minutes to an hour. Using a toothpick or cake tester, test cake in the middle and be sure it comes out clean. Cool on a cake rack and remove from pan. May be served immediately or even the next day if put into an airtight container. If dry pour a little liquor or orange juice onto it. It is also delicious served with honey onto.

The recipes and photo used in today’s article are from the kitchen of Chef Babz (babzbites@gmail.com).

PIG OUT — Sept. 27-28, downtown Maysville, barbecue competition, 5K walk/run, live music, kids carnival, Friday 5-10 p.m., Saturday noon-10 p.m.

BATTLE OF AUGUSTA ANNIVERSARY WEEKEND — Friday and Saturday, Sept. 26-27; Friday, Southern Harvest Dinner, period music, latern tour of Augusta; Saturday, living history camp demostrations. craft vendors, period music, vintage baseball game, Baker Bird Winery tours, period music, reel on the river dance, Riverside Drive, Augusta.

RUSSELL THEATRE — Oct. 4, 7 p.m., “The Wizard of Oz”; Oct. 4, 9:30 p.m., “Beetlejuice”; Oct. 12, 9 p.m., “Sleepy Hollow.”

A VISITOR’S VIEW OF MAYSVILLE — Presented by Ohio River Valley Artist Guild, during October, begins with First Friday opening reception, 5-7 p.m., Oct. 4 and runs through Tuesday, Oct. 29, at the Cox Gallery, Second Floor.

VFW HOUSE OF HORRORS — Every Saturday in October and Oct. 31 from 8 p.m. to midnight. Cost is $5 per person. Veterans and active duty military receive free admission with a valid ID. All proceeds benefit local veterans, Simon Kenton VFW Post 2734, 3177 Kentucky 9, Maysville.

KENTUCKY GATEWAY MUSEUM CENTER presents THE OLD POGUE EXPERIENCE — Showcasing the history of Maysville’s Bourbon Industry and the Old Pogue Distillery. Exhibits in the Limestone Building,corner of Second and Sutton Streets in Downtown Maysville, Tuesday to Saturday, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. For tickets visit KYGMC at 215 Sutton Street, Downtown Maysville. For additional information phone 606-564-5865.

As a little girl I always loved cake. But, there is something special about a cupcake that makes you feel special. It’s your cake, especially decorated for you to bite into however you please. As much as I love eating a cupcake, it’s the decorating that has always been my favorite part.

I fondly remember in elementary school an activity involving a plain cupcake, icing, bowls of sprinkles, and a few shades of food coloring. We all went wild. No two looked alike. Some held together better than others, but none lasted more than five minutes before being demolished by our bare hands and hungry eyes. It was the absolute best. They were treasures we could only describe to our parents as there was nothing left to show them.

As friendly as cupcakes are, they can also be intimidating. A recent cupcake order made me realize I had to take my cupcake game to the next level, literally. Nothing makes a dessert desired more than decadence, and one of my favorite ways of achieving that is increasing not just the flavor but the actual height of a dessert.

An easy way to do this with cupcakes is going beyond the frosting. You can top your cup cake with chocolate dipped fruit, candy, chocolate molds (I prefer silicone because of the easy clean), sparkle and sprinkles, and fun zesty color. If making for a group you can make the decorating a group activity with a cupcake bar. But if dressing to impress, prepare all your cakes as consistently as possible and have fun topping them off. The difference will show in your end product.

Today I have included a recipe for my favorite cupcake flavor with a few fancy tricks for updating your cupcake game.

– Use high quality cupcake liners or double-up on cupcake liners. – Fill up cupcake pans consistently. Don’t over fill or under fill. But whatever you do, try and fill with the same portion.

– Gently press down on the cupcake. If the cupcake bounces back completely, they are done. If your finger left a dent in the cupcake, they need more time. – Allow to cool completely before frosting.

– Store properly: Unfrosted cupcakes are wonderful left at room temperature for a few days. Cover them tightly and they’ll stay soft, moist, and fluffy until you’re ready to decorate them. After you frost them, they’re OK for a day or two at room temperature, but should be refrigerated after that.

Spray baking dish or cupcake tin/silicone mold with nonstick cooking spray. If making cupcakes, line each spot with a cupcake liner. Use two in each spot for extra support if desired.

In a medium sauce-pan combine the butter, shortening, cocoa and water, while stirring bring to a boil. Remove from heat. Cool to lukewarm. Sift the flour and sugar together. Combine this with the lukewarm cocoa mixture. Add the eggs, salt, vanilla, buttermilk and baking soda, and mix well. Pour batter into pan and bake for 30-35 minutes if baking cake. If baking cupcakes, pour ¼ cup of batter into each spot and bake for 12-18 minutes, or until a toothpick incerted into center of cake comes out clean.

Combine butter, cocoa and milk. Heat until butter melts and ingredients are well combined. Remove from heat. Add vanilla. Beat in powdered sugar. If too stiff add more milk, 1 tbsp at a time until frosting reaches desired consistency. Spread on warm muffin or cake.

Break the dark and white chocolate into pieces and melt separately in heatproof bowls set over saucepans barely simmering with water. Spoon heaping teaspoonfulls of melted chocolate onto a baking sheat, spreading the chocolate into disks with the back of the spoon. Scatter with sprinkles or desired décor. Set aside to cool and harden completely before removing from the parchment with a round bladed knife.

Once melted, use a spoon, melting bottle or disposable decorating bag to fill the mold and tap it lightly so any air bubbles will float to the surface.

Place the filled mold in the fridge or freezer until the entire bottom of the mold looks frosted over and candy is set. Watch out for dark-looking area. These indicate candy is still soft. Unmold candy by turning the mold over about an inch from a flat surface or by gently flexing or tapping the mold to loosen them.

The recipes and photo used in today’s article are from the kitchen of Chef Babz (babzbites@gmail.com) with a little help from her friend and mentor Isla J. Calton.

DINA OVANOVA — Presetned by the John W. McNeill Memorial Music Series, Washington Opera House, 7 p.m., Thursday, Sept. 19. .

SONS & DAUGHTERS OF THUNDER — Free screening with tickets, Sept. 20, Clooney Community Centr, Augusta, 7-9 p.m., hosted by ACEHA, tickets available at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/movie-screening-of-sons-daughters-of-thunder-tickets-69239137123. Seating is limited.

RUSSELL THEATRE — Sept. 20, “Pink Floyd: The Wall,” 8 p.m.; Sept, 21, “Saturday Night Fever,” 7 p.m; Sept. 22, Rosemary Clooney Tribute perfromance, 3 p.m.; Oct. 4, 7 p.m., “The Wizard of Oz”; Oct. 4, 9:30 p.m., “Beetlejuice”; Oct. 12, 9 p.m., “Sleepy Hollow”.

SIMON KENTON FESTIVAL — Sept. 21-22 in Old Washington, 9 a.m.-6 p.m., on Saturday and 10 a.m.-5 p.m., on Sunday.

A VISITOR’S VIEW OF MAYSVILLE — Presented by Ohio River Valley Artist Guild, during Octobe, begins with First Friday opening reception, 5-7 p.m., Oct. 4 and runs through Tuesday, Oct. 29, at the Cox Gallery, Second Floor.

VFW HOUSE OF HORRORS — Every Saturday in October and Oct. 31 from 8 p.m. to midnight. Cost is $5 per person. Veterans and active duty military receive free admission with a valid ID. All proceeds benefit local veterans, Simon Kenton VFW Post 2734, 3177 Kentucky 9, Maysville.

KENTUCKY GATEWAY MUSEUM CENTER presents THE OLD POGUE EXPERIENCE — Showcasing the history of Maysville’s Bourbon Industry and the Old Pogue Distillery. Exhibits in the Limestone Building,corner of Second and Sutton Streets in Downtown Maysville, Tuesday to Saturday, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. For tickets visit KYGMC at 215 Sutton Street, Downtown Maysville. For additional information phone 606-564-5865.

recipe When craving the fruit and veggies produced in the Ohio River Valley, it was only within the last ten years my mind began to go to the delicious fig. Always a fan of this sweet and humble fruit, I was unaware there were so many of my neighbors growing them in their own back yards. My first experience with a fresh-picked Kentucky fig was after an insane Saturday of cooking in downtown Maysville.

It had been one of those days where you think you are gonna close up shop at two or three and suddenly it’s four or five. I had fed what felt like everyone on both sides of the river except for my own growling tummy. If you talk to most cooks or chefs, professional or at home, we have no problem feeding everyone else but for some reason we struggle to feed ourselves after a busy day over the oven. The last thing I felt like doing was eating anything I had created that day. Or even worse, cooking something new and spending more time over the oven.

My stomach growled as one more customer and friend approached the counter. She had a small cloth bag over her arm. I asked her what she would like from the menu, as I was getting ready to close up shop. To my surprise she pulled out three beautiful figs she had just picked before coming to visit me. I will never grow tired of the gift of food or eating someone else’s food. I pulled out the closed sign, grabbed a cutting board, knife, jar of honey, and a little goat cheese and rushed to join my thoughtful friend for a late lunch. To this day I don’t ever recall enjoying a fig so much. They were still warm from the sun and melted in your mouth with every bite. We could’ve eaten ten of them, but it made them feel more special in many ways that we could only eat the three. I was full of bliss and Kentucky figs I didn’t even realize existed.

You don’t have to have-grown figs in order to enjoy them, but it never hurts to know someone that does. Today I have included one of my favorite delicious fig recipes. It can be made from fresh figs or dried figs. But don’t let me mislead you, the fig doesn’t need anything to taste delicious but if you wanna wow guests with a sophisticated but simple ingredient be sure and include the humble but decadent fig. Good luck and enjoy!

• Look for slightly firm fruit. They will yield slightly too gentle pressure on their outer skin. Avoid any that feel too soft to the touch. If a slightly sour smell is produced by the fruit, don’t eat it. You can’t just a fig by its color as they range from greenish yellow, purple, to black.

• After picking or purchasing, be sure and tore in a refrigerator and try and use within a few days.

Wash fruit before serving or cooking. Don’t feel like you have to use silverware with this juicy fruit. It’s best eaten uncooked and out of your hand when fresh.

Combine flour, 1/4 cup sugar and 1/8 tsp salt in a food processor and pulse to combine. Add 1/ cup butter and pulse 6-8 times or until the butter is the size of small peas. Gradually add the ice water, pulsing constantly until the dough just begins to adhere. Place the dough on a piece of plastic wrap and shape into a disc. Wrap the plastic wrap and chill for two hours or longer.

Combine the hazelnuts and one cup sugar in a food processor and pulse until finely ground. Add one cup butter and pulse until combined. Add the eggs one at a time, processing until combined after each addition. Chill for two hours or longer.

Let the dough stand at room temperature for five to ten minutes. Roll the dough ½ inch thick on a lightly floured surface and cut into eight to ten rounds with a five inch cutter. Chill the rounds for twenty minutes. Roll the rounds into six inch circles on a lightly floured surface. Toss the figs, honey, ¼ cup sugar and 1/8 tsp salt in a bowl and let stand at room temperature for twenty minutes.

Preheat the oven to 32 degrees. Place the chilled rounds on one or two baking sheets and spoon one tbsp. of the hazelnut mix on the center of each of the chilled circles. Evenly divide the fig mixture among the rounds. Beginning at the top, fold the dough over itself towards the center, working all the way around the circle. You should have a 1 1/2-inch rolled edge enclosing the figs. Whisk the egg yolks and cream in a bowl until blended and bush over the dough. Sprinkle with ¼ cup sugar and bake for 20-30 minutes or until golden brown.

The recipe used in today’s article is from the kitchen of Chef Babz (babzbites@gmail.com) with a little help from Zoe Coulson, The Good Housekeeping Cookbook, 1973.

Several months ago my son presented me with a question,”What does your schedule look like during Labor Day weekend? Keep it open if you can.”

Off and on, my son Josh would bring up the subject to see if I still had that weekend open. The answers were always the same. Yes the weekend is still open and where are we going?

“All you need to know is we are going on a road trip together and everything is taken care of,” was his stock reply.

Well, Labor Day was almost upon us and I still didn’t have a clue of our destination. Everyone I thought would give me answers seemed to be avoiding me.

Thursday before Labor Day weekend brought an end to the mystery. Josh handed me a DVD of the movie “Field of Dreams.”

Stunned, I didn’t know what to say. For a moment we just stared at each other. I had in my mind that we may be going to Green Bay, Wisconsin for a Packer’s exhibition football game or Chicago to watch the Cubs play at Wrigley Field. I even thought about a trip to Cooperstown (New York) to see the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

After learning of all the research that my son put into this, he explained that he stumbled across the 30th Anniversary of Team of Dreams game at Dyersville, Iowa during Labor Day weekend played on the original field where the movie “Field of Dreams” was filmed in 1989. He bought both of our tickets and even a parking pass. And booked our motel accommodations in Dubuque, Iowa which was about 45 miles from the ball field.

It turned out, I was indirectly correct on some of the aspects of this trip. We were going to watch former major league baseball players. Some of those former Chicago Cub players and most of them in MLB’s Hall of Fame in Cooperstown. We will be just a stone’s throw from Wisconsin and in the direction of Green Bay.

To be honest, I didn’t even know the original movie site was still in place and later found out that many other fans of the game didn’t know as well.

Our adventure began on time and on schedule. The question of lunch surfaced as we approached western Indiana.

“Dad. Do you remember the movie “Hoosiers?” Well it was filmed in New Richmond, Indiana. We’re going to eat at the Hickory Cafe,” remarked Josh.

And we did. The cafe was serving lunch slowly with only one cook on duty. While waiting for our food we ambled around looking at all of the Hoosier movie memorabilia that filled just about every wall of the diner. Photos of actor Gene Hackman, Barbara Hershey and basketball scenes from the movie lined each wall of the multi-room restaurant. After eating our lunch, Josh took me on a tour of the town pointing out various places where the movie scenes were filmed.

Driving across Illinois brought us to the great Mississippi River. I had a little surprise for Josh. I did a little homework on my own and discovered that the television show “American Pickers” has a store in LeClaire, Iowa, along the Mississippi River.

I told Josh after crossing the Mississippi River, take the first turn, go to the stop light and turn left. He did and we soon were sitting in the parking lot of “American Pickers.”

Closing at 6 p.m. didn’t give us much time to look around. We bought souvenirs and were back on our way to Dubuque, Iowa to check into our motel.

Traveling down 3 miles of gravel roads eventually brought us to the parking lot of Field of Dreams. The well manicured ball field was just like it was in the movie with its outfield lined with acres of tall corn. The farm house with its wrap around porch appeared to be identical. The only thing we noticed was the porch swing was missing. Later read on a nearby message board that the swing was returned to a local person who donated it for use in the movie. Barns that were shown in the movie was also just like they were. For the celebrity softball game, additional bleachers were brought in to accommodate the large crowd that was expected.

For most of the day we watched fathers and sons and daughters play pitch and catch on the field. Patrons visiting were allowed to go onto the field to play baseball, or just bring blankets and chairs and relax. However, house tours were not offered due to the special softball game that would be played later that afternoon. Major league players and movie actors were on hand to sign autographs throughout the day. Dwier Brown who portrayed John Kinsella, father of Ray Kinsella,(Kevin Costner) in the movie was also signing autographs and posing with fans for photos.

Ghost players in vintage Chicago White Sox uniforms were on hand to play catch or offer tips on playing the game to youngsters.

Each Sunday, ghost players show up in uniform to welcome visitors and play baseball. Visitors could wander into the outfield corn and pretend they are appearing or disappearing in the corn similar to the way it was done in the movie.

The celebrity softball game was comprised of both retired major league baseball players such as Reggie Jackson, Wade Boggs, Steve Carlton, Jim Edmonds, Ozzie Smith, David Ross, and Rickey Henderson.

Movie actors from both “A League of their Own” and “The Sandlot” were also selected to star in the game. Ann Cusack and Megan Cavanaugh from the 1992 movie “A League of their Own” who played Shirley Baker and Marty Hooch respectively played in the game. Several actors who played in the 1993 movie “The Sandlot” also suited up for the game. Tom Guiry who portrayed Scotty Small in the movie and Chaucey Leopardi who played the part of Squints and Marty York who portrayed Yeah-Yeah were also in the game. Due to poor field lighting, the game was shortened for both the safety of the fans and the players.

Following the clearing of the field, a giant screen about the size of a drive-in theater screen was hoisted up from the cornfield in left field and the 1989 movie “Field of Dreams” was shown to those who wished to view it one more time.

August 13, 2020 will be a special day for Major League Baseball. A new ball park is under construction just past the outfield of Field of Dreams for a regular season game between the New York Yankees and the Chicago White Sox. It will be a three-game series with game one being played on the new field in Iowa and game two and three in Chicago. Rumors are spreading that the game in Iowa is a sell out already.

RUSSELL THEATRE — Sept. 13, 7 p.m., “Pretty Woman;” Sept. 14, “Rocky Horror Picture Show,” 7 p.m. and 10 p.m.

FILTHY 5K — Saturday, Sept. 14, Ford Acres Farm.Registration on Facebook or at Active.com. Registration includes a T-shirt, event medal and coupons for local businesses.

SWINGTIME ON THE RIVER — Featuring “Swingtime Big Band,” Augusta Riverside Riverwalk, Saturday, Sept.14, 6:30-9:30 p.m., limited reserve seating, $12 per person or $90 per table of eight.

MISSION AEROSPACE — By Minotaur Mazes, the Kentucky Gateway Museum Center’s summer exhibit, now on display until Sept. 14, KYGMC Calvert Gallery, Tuesday-Saturday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., 215 Sutton Street, Maysville.

UP IN THE AIR: THE HISTORY OF FLIGHT — Through Sept. 14, in the KYGMC Wormald Gallery, Tuesday-Saturday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., 215 Sutton Street, Maysville.

SONS & DAUGHTERS OF THUNDER — Free screening with tickets, Sept. 20, Clooney Community Centr, Augusta, 7-9 p.m., hosted by ACEHA, tickets available at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/movie-screening-of-sons-daughters-of-thunder-tickets-69239137123. Seating is limited.

RUSSELL THEATRE — Sept. 20, “Pink Floyd: The Wall,” 8 p.m.; Sept, 21, “Saturday Night Fever,” 7 p.m; Sept. 22, Rosemary Clooney Tribute perfromance, 3 p.m.

VFW HOUSE OF HORRORS — Every Saturday in October and Oct. 31 from 8 p.m. to midnight. Cost is $5 per person. Veterans and active duty military receive free admission with a valid ID. All proceeds benefit local veterans, Simon Kenton VFW Post 2734, 3177 Kentucky 9, Maysville.

KENTUCKY GATEWAY MUSEUM CENTER presents THE OLD POGUE EXPERIENCE — Showcasing the history of Maysville’s Bourbon Industry and the Old Pogue Distillery. Exhibits in the Limestone Building,corner of Second and Sutton Streets in Downtown Maysville, Tuesday to Saturday, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. For tickets visit KYGMC at 215 Sutton Street, Downtown Maysville. For additional information phone 606-564-5865.

We have all been that person at dinner who isn’t hungry, but can’t stop nibbling on the dips and spreads put out by our host. At a potluck earlier this week, I was totally that person. They may as well have given me my own bag of chips. By the time dinner was served my level of full had gone to stuffed. What is it about dips and spreads that is so irresistible? Some might say the presentation while others might say the dish itself. Either way, empty trays speak for themselves. Some might even say the start of the party determines the success of a party. My hostess was clever about pacing out the food. Her husband finished the grill work while appetizer and cocktail time for guests gave them a little bit of breathing space … time to put the finishing touches on dinner, mingle with guests, and sample a few things on the first course table. Appetizers can be as simple as a tray of veggies served with a creamy dip, or an enormous chunk of cheese and a basket of crackers. Whatever you decide to serve, unless you plan to make a meal of appetizers like I did, keep the quantity to a minimum. The object is to stimulate the appetite of your guests, not kill it.

Today I have included a few of my favorite dips and spreads for making ahead or serving immediately. I have also included details for serving with toast points and veggie dip. Many fine restaurants and casual ones serve toast points with appetizers. This recipe has helped me many times when I have been in a no crackers or chips pickle. Raw vegetable with dips make a beautiful centerpiece for the cocktail table or appetizer table. These recipes will help you think about the many options you have to create the presentation and flavor you are looking for.

Select a large platter or tray. Arrange one or two dunking bowls in the center. Add a layer of leaf lettuce to a base, and veggies (like the spokes of a wheel).

Use a loaf of thinly sliced sandwich bread. Cut each slice diagonally in both directions so that you have four triangular pieces of bread, or points.

Place the cut bread in a single layer on a cookie sheet. Bake in a 350 degree oven for 12-15 minutes, or until bread begins to brown. Remove from oven and allow cooling for ten minutes in pan before removing. Pile toast points in to a napkin lined basket or silver bread server and e assured they will add a lil crunch to the day.

Let cheese warm to room temperature. Blend all ingredients. Flavor is improved if dip is made to three hours before serving.

Mash avocados. Add sour cream, garlic powder, salt, lime juice, chopped chilies. Stir well. Add onion and tomato and stir again. If not serving immediately, place avocado pits in mx, cover and refrigerate. Pits will prevent guac from turning dark.

Beat together cream cheese, sour cream, Worcestershire, shallots parsley, garlic, salt, pepper, and liquid hot pepper seasoning. Crumble in blue cheese and mix until well distributed. Cover and chill.

The recipe and photos used in today’s article are from the kitchen of Chef Babz (babzbites@gmail.com) with a lot of help from her dear friend and mentor, Ila J. Calton.

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Schedule subject to change and/or blackouts Saturday, October 12 AUTO RACING 10:30 a.m. FS1 — NASCAR Gander Outdoors Truck Series: qualifying, Talladega, Ala. 12 p.m. NBC — IMSA WeatherTech: Sports Car Championship, Braselton, Ga. 1:30 […]

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